Agreement Of Karabakh

The final status of Nagorno-Karabakh itself is not defined in the agreement. Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev reacted to the agreement with these words: “This declaration represents armenia`s capitulation. This declaration puts an end to years of occupation. [16] Large-scale celebrations erupted throughout Azerbaijan, especially in the capital Baku, when news of the agreement was announced. [17] “At the same time, [the Lachin corridor] will not affect the city of Shusha,” the agreement reads. Azerbaijan claimed to have seized the city on Monday. Anger had already risen in Armenia before the deal, with seventeen opposition parties on Monday calling on Pachinjan and the rest of his government to resign immediately. The agreement stipulates that a transport road will be built along the Lachin corridor, provided by Russian peacekeeping forces that “ensure road safety along the Lachin corridor of citizens, vehicles and goods in both directions.” Aliyev also said Turkey, a close ally of Baku, would participate in the peacekeeping center to oversee the ceasefire. Since the outbreak of fighting on 27 September, several thousand people have reportedly been killed on both sides. Three ceasefire agreements collapsed as soon as they entered into force. After the signing of the agreement, Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan said: “This is not a victory, but there is no defeat until you consider yourself defeated, we will never consider ourselves defeated, and it will be a new beginning of an era of national unity and rebirth.” [13] After the ceasefire agreement was announced, violent protests erupted in Yerevan. Armenian parliament spokesman Ararat Mirzoyan was beaten by an angry mob that stormed parliament after the peace deal was announced. Pashinyan, however, suggested that Mirzoyan`s life was “not threatened” and that he had undergone surgery. [14] [15] Armenian opposition parties called on the government to revoke the agreement.

And the country`s president, Armen Sarkisian, distanced himself from the deal, said he learned about the negotiations from the media and called for “political consultations” to find a way out of the crisis. A Kremlin spokesman said there had been no agreement on sending Turkish peacekeeping forces to the controversial area, but that the Turkish military would help occupy a joint observation center with Russian forces. . . .